The Genus Strategus Kirby (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) in Louisiana

Kim and Brou 2018 Share-page-001.jpg

My research has recently been published. (co-author: Vernon A. Brou, Jr.). It is a taxonomic review of the Genus Strategus Kirby in Louisiana. Strategus aloeus and S. mormon are previously recorded from Louisiana. S. antaeus is recorded from Louisiana by Ratcliffe and Cave (2017) based on a series of collections provided by Junsuk Kim, the senior author (myself). To these three species, we’ve added one additional species newly recorded from Louisiana, the S. splendens. Distribution and (temporal) phenogram are illustrated with plate images of all species.

Kim, J. and V. A. Brou, Jr. 2018. The Genus Strategus Kirby (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) in Louisiana. The Southern Lepidopterists’ News, 40, 100-105.

*PDF is available upon a request.

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Strategus splendens (Palisot de Beauvois, 1809) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae)

Strategus splendens (Palisot de Beauvois, 1809)
Scarabaeus splendens Palisot de Beauvois 1809 (original combination).
Scarabaeus boscii Palisot de Beauvois 1809 (synonym).
Anastrategus cognatus Casey 1915 (synonym).
Anastrategus carolinensis Casey 1915 (synonym).

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Description: Strategus splendens (Palisot de Beauvois) is known to occur from southeastern USA (Ratcliffe 1976; Ratcliffe and Cave 2017). Kim and Brou (2018) reported S. splendens for the first time based on a single record, a male from the collection of Louisiana State Arthropod Museum, dated 10 June 1958, Baton Rouge, LA. The pictured specimen is from East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, deposited in Louisiana State Arthropod Museum (Baton Rouge, LA, USA).

References:

Kim, J. and V. A. Brou Jr. 2018. The Genus Strategus Kirby (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) in Louisiana. The Southern Lepidopterists’ News, 40, 100-105.

Ratcliffe, B. C. 1976. A revision of the genus Strategus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). Bulletin of the University of Nebraska State Museum 10: 93-204.

Ratcliffe, B. C. and R. D. Cave. 2017. The dynastine scarab beetles of the United States and Canada (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae). Bulletin of the University of Nebraska State Museum 30: 1-298.

Strategus antaeus Drury, 1773 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae)

Strategus antaeus Drury, 1773
Scarabaeus antaeus Drury 1773 (original combination).
Scarabaeus maimon Fabricius 1775 (synonym).
Strategus divergens Casey 1915 (synonym).
Strategus atrolucens Casey 1915 (synonym).
Strategus pinorum Casey 1915 (synonym).
Strategus septentrionis Casey 1915 (synonym).
Strategus sinuatus Casey 1915 (synonym).
Strategus semistriatus Casey 1915 (synonym).
Strategus antaeus houstonensis Knaus 1925 (synonym).

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Description: Strategus antaeus (Drury) is known to occur in eastern USA west to Oklahoma and Texas (Ratcliffe 1976) with first report by Ratcliffe and Cave (2017) from Louisiana based upon a series of specimens previously collected in Natchitoches Parish by Junsuk Kim (Kim and Brou 2018). Kim and Brou (2018) stated S. antaeus adults in Louisiana actively flies from May to September with peak adult flight ranges from the last week of May to the first week of June. The pictured specimens are from Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana.

References:

Kim, J. and V. A. Brou Jr. 2018. The Genus Strategus Kirby (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) in Louisiana. The Southern Lepidopterists’ News, 40, 100-105.

Ratcliffe, B. C. 1976. A revision of the genus Strategus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). Bulletin of the University of Nebraska State Museum 10: 93-204.

Ratcliffe, B. C. and R. D. Cave. 2017. The dynastine scarab beetles of the United States and Canada (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae). Bulletin of the University of Nebraska State Museum 30: 1-298.

Strategus aloeus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae)

Strategus aloeus (Linnaeus, 1758)
Scarabaeus aloeus Linnaeus 1758 (original combination).
Geotrupes semiramis Fabricius 1801 (synonym).
Scarabaeus aesalus Laporte 1840 (synonym).
Strategus julianus Burmeister 1847 (synonym).
Strategus piosomus Kolbe 1906 (synonym).
Strategus julianus arizonicus Schaeffer 1915 (synonym).
Strategus roosevelti Casey 1915 (synonym).
Strategus frontalis Casey 1915 (synonym).
Strategus tarsalis Casey 1915 (synonym).
Strategus gaillardi Casey 1915 (synonym).

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Description: Strategus aloeus (Linnaeus) is most commonly and widely distributed species in the genus ranged from the southern USA through Central America to central Brazil and Bolivia (Ratcliffe 1976; Ratcliffe and Cave 2017). This species in state Louisiana occurs from January to October, with peak flight period in late June to early July. (Kim and Brou 2018).  The pictured specimens are from Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana (male) and Rapides Parish, Louisiana (female).

References:

Kim, J. and V. A. Brou Jr. 2018. The Genus Strategus Kirby (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) in Louisiana. The Southern Lepidopterists’ News, 40, 100-105.

Ratcliffe, B. C. 1976. A revision of the genus Strategus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). Bulletin of the University of Nebraska State Museum 10: 93-204.

Ratcliffe, B. C. and R. D. Cave. 2017. The dynastine scarab beetles of the United States and Canada (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae). Bulletin of the University of Nebraska State Museum 30: 1-298.

Dermestid Beetle Infection to the Collections!!

Dermestid Beetles are beetle family Dermestidae under the order Coleoptera that feed on dead organisms. Specifically, dead insects in this case. They can be a real pain and damage to the museum collections as all they do is eat, eat, and EAT those food! or the valuable collections to the museum scientists.

I first encountered while living in rather an old apartment complex where pest management is poorly done. I’ve been seeing number of silverfish and dermestid beetles every weekend while cleaning. Now I moved to a house, hoped not to see any of those pest, but….. THIS!! Must be from the time when I was in the apartment.

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All I have to do is just place that entire unit tray into the freezer to freeze them to death. I think this particular infected specimen is the most recent collection placed in this unit tray, as well as in this drawer. However, as the specimen is collected on July 2016, I’m unsure whether it has infiltrated at the time of placement, or in a later date. I’m hoping there isn’t any hole or gap anywhere on the drawer. Collections in this drawer is non-scarabs, that I rarely ever touch, which may be the reason that I finally, after the entire leg chewed up, found the infection. Although, there are some valuable (as in rarity) collections in this drawer, so I’m afraid to see any pest inside. I hope that one unit tray is the only one that had the dermestid beetles.